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Sometimes in women’s soccer, hitting an opponent in the face once with a throw-in just isn’t enough (video)

Nov 5, 2012, 4:36 PM EDT

throwin

What’s the toughest, most dangerous sport? Some say rugby, others, American football. My vote is for women’s soccer — I’ve played the former two, but I’d never get onto the pitch with some of these girls.

It was a Division III college match between Amherst and Colby, when Amherst defender Emily Little decided that nailing Colby midfielder Maddie Tight in the face with a throw-in would be a good thing to do. Not once, but twice.

Amherst was up 1-0 when Little went slightly berserk, drawing a yellow card for noggin’ bashing. Little was knocked to the ground after the second shot, and it doesn’t look like she’s flopping. And some in the crowd are not amused.

And to think, all of this could have been avoided if Amherst had got going a little sooner on that Sportsmanship Statement.

  1. dr0pkickram0nes - Nov 5, 2012 at 11:59 PM

    Clean play!

  2. icelovinbrotha215 - Nov 6, 2012 at 8:32 PM

    So was it or was it not a class act?

    • florida727 - Nov 7, 2012 at 7:31 AM

      Seriously. You have to even ask that question? I hope you’re just being sarcastic.

  3. azr1988 - Nov 7, 2012 at 11:41 PM

    https://www.amherst.edu/athletics/teams/fall/soccer-w/roster/bios/little

    A classless play from a classless individual.

  4. dukfootball - Nov 12, 2012 at 11:10 PM

    I saw something similar once in the movie: “The Longest Yard,” but the movie was mostly gutter humor and the game wasn’t being played by people of integrity or sport, it was played mostly by prisoners. Miss Little needs to check herself, and remember that however fiercely she may be battling to win the game and leave it all on the field, you still need to respect your opponent (and yourself), or you might as well play “Rollerball.”
    What this video shows is about as much skill as it takes to walk up and kick someone in the nuts without warning. Foot skills, and out-flanking your opponents may have been a better avenue to show your integrity, class, and skill.