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Bully power-slammed into concrete by fed-up kid victim (video)

Mar 14, 2011, 5:48 PM EDT

caseypunisher

Bully victims, this one goes out to you. Casey Heynes, the big kid in the red shirt pictured here, was being taunted by a smaller, aggressive kid. In the video below, you see the kid punch Casey in the face, then continue to punch and torment him until … what’s this? Is that Casey’s entrance music I hear? Yep, the bigger kid finally gets fed up and body-slams the little twerp into the pavement. Enjoy:

YouTube has been busily taking down this video all day, but the one above should work. here’s another non-YouTube version.

Believe it or not, Casey was suspended for this. From various message boards, I’m seeing that he got four days, while the bully got 22 days. That’s not confirmed, however. As you can see, after Casey pulverized his tormentor, another, bigger bully stepped in to get in a little trash talking. Nice. Australia, is there any way we can push you further out to sea?

Anyway, Casey’s supporters have started a Facebook page, calling it Casey the Punisher (322 members as of now). Some very lively comments over there. And just wait until Jason “Mayhem” Miller hears about this.

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Little Zangief: Casey Haynes unloads on bully [NowPublic]

  1. th3j4ckl3 - Mar 14, 2011 at 10:43 PM

    The kid on the left is a punk snot piece of crap. That and his buddy laughing that was video taping it. I was in caseys shoes when I went to school in the 80s by punk kids like these. Did you hear him and his buddy laughing when they got up. Whats worse is that the parents are either clueless of this kids behavior or don’t really care. In life you get what you deserve. My daughter was bullied in her school repeatedly by another girl. The principal of the school told us “Dont let her retaliate. If someone hits her drop to the ground and curl up in a ball till help arrives.” Really?!?! Our school principal tells us they have a low tolerance policy and this is how you defend yourself. Where are the parents of the bully involved? Ooh yeah I know the story “why my kid? I’ll sue the school! That’s what I’ll do.”. How many times has the parent of the Casey been to to school to talk about the problem? Did the parents going to the school only make it worse for the kid. In my case as a parent when I went to the school, the teacher told the bully “I dont want to hear her parents going to the school administration anymore.”. The teacher told the bully this?!! What did she do in our case? Bullied our child even more.

    I’m sorry but Casey… You have the backing of a nation behind you. Stand tall!

    • tauro2 - Mar 15, 2011 at 6:38 PM

      This is for Rick Chandler.

      Hi Rick, I find your comment (Australia, is there any way we can push you further out to sea?)
      offensive and very hypocritical coming from someone that lives in the birth place of such disgusting acts as depicted in the video.
      The American population and these type of acts are thousands of times greater than that of Australia’s.
      Your comment is a classic case of the pot calling the kettle black!!

      It’s just a shame aussie kids have to copycat your cruel culture and I just hope our kids don’t start shooting one another at school.
      I don’t like how the Australian culture is being corrupted by this American culture.
      The internet is largely responsible and I believe because of this culture of socializing through social media it is creating a generation of young people who are becoming socially and emotionally sterile.
      A lot of young people today are lacking in basic life skills, skills of which will never be learnt from using online social networks.
      They also lack basic knowledge and common sense.
      God help them if they end up running the world in the future.
      I am glad I won’t be around to see it.

      • nocomment2011 - Mar 16, 2011 at 4:28 PM

        What rock did you crawl out from under, Jack (and I don’t mean Kangaroo Jack either). You give Aussies a bad name. If I recall, Australia was once a penal colony. You must be a rugby player who suffered too many concussions.

        Oh by ther way, I was bullied as a kid, and I never fought back because all it did was make things worse. Kids who are bullied suffer from self esteem problems and often lead to other psychological problems. This also applies to the bully

  2. danturkette - Mar 14, 2011 at 11:47 PM

    http://www.caseyheynes.com/

    We’re thinking of starting a college fund for this kid if we can get in touch with his parents.

  3. stuckonwords - Mar 15, 2011 at 1:10 AM

    Wow.
    Umm…okay, I get that we all hate bullies, and that Casey did what many of us wish we’d done in similar situations. But I mean seriously, a little kid…a very misguided, poorly-raised kid…just got totally body-slammed into the concrete. How can any of us act like this was a good thing? Shouldn’t we all be saddened by the state of affairs in today’s society that we find ourselves cheering when a child gets slammed into the concrete?
    Columbine happened because of bullying like this. Many school shootings have happened because of bullying like this. Instead of cheering that a little boy was smashed to the ground, shouldn’t the lesson here be that we need to improve the culture our children have to live in ??
    I’m glad Casey defended himself. And I worry about possible backlash he might have to yet face (from the other big kid who pursued him at the end, as well as any others in that gang). But I worry more that our (and Australia’s) educational institutions are so completely incapable of providing a better, safer environment. We spend zillions of dollars at war, but schools can’t be built to keep pace with the growing population. Teachers can’t be hired to keep pace with the growing population. And teacher’s pay? Can’t afford to pay them much, because we’ve got much more important things to spend money on than our children…the future adults who’ll run this world.
    It’s all very troubling.

    • arlytaandrew - Mar 15, 2011 at 2:04 AM

      We are not “cheering” because a “child gets slammed into the concrete” – we are cheering because a BULLY is getting what he deserves- he needs to be put in his place and the quickest most effective way to acheive that is fighting back. That little boy thinks he’s such a hero hitting someone bigger than him and he got shamed.That boy has hopefully now learned a valuable lesson for the rest of his life- he just happened to learn it the hard way.

    • bhartman36 - Mar 15, 2011 at 2:04 AM

      @stuckonwords:

      I agree that Casey’s bodyslam was excessive. He could’ve easily hurt the little punk a lot worse. But I don’t think the answer is more teachers, or more money towards schools. It’s not that more teachers or money towards schools is a bad thing. I just think it would be totally worthless in this situation. Unless you’ve got a 1:1 ratio between students and teachers, teenage boys (which these kids apparently are) are going to fight. That’s just the way the world works. And there will always be bullies, because some kids are just plain bad.

      Put very simply, some children are bullies, and need to be taught lessons. I’m glad the boy wasn’t more severely injured, but I think he learned his lesson the only way he was going to learn it.

      • stuckonwords - Mar 15, 2011 at 2:37 AM

        Hell, I’m not really saying the bodyslam was excessive. In my mind, Casey’s not obligated to have to figure out what is or isn’t “too much”. What I’m saying isn’t that what Casey did was wrong at all, but that the environment kids live with in school makes all this *possible*. Seriously, kids today go through a whole lot more than kids did 20 or 30 years ago. To say that it isn’t about school ratios is pretending that “there’s nothing we can do”. That’s just irresponsible. Of *course* there’s something we could do. Kids are essentially *raised* by their schools (how many families have both working parents?), and yet the ratios have declined steadily. What do you expect to happen in a “Lord of the Flies” environment? There is *far* more bullying going on today than 20 years ago, and it’s getting worse all the time. The schools care about one thing…….pushing the kids through to the next grade, and test scores for the government.

    • g0thicicecream - Mar 15, 2011 at 8:54 AM

      Kids have picked on each other since the beginning of time. This isn’t new, isn’t the first time, and definitely won’t be the last.

      I don’t know, I got picked on in jr high and high school, but I fought back once it got to me enough, and once you fight back the people that bully you usually get the point and stop.

      …as long as these kids aren’t killing each other, let them go through the growing pains of being a kid…they should learn to stand up for themselves or they’re going have a much harder time later on in life…as long as it’s not getting out of hand, you just gotta kinda let the kids work it out…not to say adults shouldn’t step in and straighten some of these kids up, but adults can’t be everywhere all of the time…

      • stuckonwords - Mar 15, 2011 at 10:27 PM

        First of all, “as long as these kids aren’t killing each other”. Doesn’t it bother you that kids are killing each other all over America? Multiple times every year you hear about just exactly that. Gothic…they *are* killing each other. That didn’t happen with these two kids, but that sure doesn’t equate to a broad statement that kids aren’t killing each other. And yes…that’s a whole lot different than 20 years ago.
        What’s more, where is it written that just because you, or maybe some other folks with examples, who were *able* to fight back and put a stop to the nonsense, that *other* kids are able to follow your brave (and in today’s world, perhaps foolhardy) decision to fight back? Do you not know that not *every* kid who gets beaten up in school is capable of beating up their attackers? I mean seriously…they’re usually getting picked on because they’re the weaker ones, the ones who *can’t* win in a fight. I genuinely don’t mean to offend you, but I can’t help but think that it’s a bit pompous to suggest that all the victims out there should just “man up” and beat up the bullies. Not everyone is you, and not everyone would come out of a situation like that intact. To tell a kid who has no prayer of surviving a fight with their bully that that’s their best recourse is like passing a death sentence on them and telling yourself you’re being wise.

    • bradenbost - Mar 15, 2011 at 9:28 AM

      I want to point something out–

      It is a complete MYTH that Columbine happened as a result of bullying. I know that’s the common conception and that’s what everyone says, but it’s not true. Not remotely. Just like the stories of that girl who was asked if she believed in God, said yes, and was shot execution style. Didn’t happen. Do a little research on this and you’ll see I’m right. The Columbine kids WERE the bullies. They were not popular, as many bullies are, but they were the instigators in situations and they terrorized other kids. Crying out for sympathy for that skinny kid while citing Columbine as the reason is backwards.

      • bradenbost - Mar 15, 2011 at 10:07 AM

        http://articles.cnn.com/2009-04-20/justice/columbine.myths_1_trench-coat-mafia-columbine-high-school-school-shooting?_s=PM:CRIME

      • stuckonwords - Mar 15, 2011 at 10:00 PM

        If the book cited in your reference below can answer the question as to how those kids came to have the attitudes and feelings they ended up having, I’ll defer. But how can you say, without investigating their lives and backgrounds, how they became jaded? How they became violent? How they became amoral? To simply state that nobody bullied them last week…that they themselves were bullies…pretends that the whole story can be summed up in an investigation surrounding the events that took place. Children don’t just become murderers from nowhere.
        There has been plenty of discussion in many blogs concerning the fact that the boy who attacked Casey…Richard…may well have been bullied into the act. There clearly were others (photographer, as well as the bigger kid at the end of the video) who were the true instigators of the incident. Was Richard just doing what instinct told him to do? “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.”? So while everyone is hailing the fact that the kid came within an inch of his life (hitting his head instead of his foot), maybe we shouldn’t judge until, and if, the entire set of facts come out. Yes, Richard looked like he was enjoying himself. Was he forced, over a period of months of being a victim, himself, to “cross over to the dark side”? Again…kids don’t become murderers from nothing. And little kids don’t just start beating up big kids from nothing. EVERY kid is born innocent; a clean slate. How they devolved into the kind of kid who performs these horrendous acts…well…maybe we should care about that.
        Casey did what he had to do. He has no obligation to measure his response. But why did Richard do what he did? And really…do *you* know why the kids at Columbine did what they did, other than because they wanted to be famous? *Why* did they want to become famous? Because they were born evil? Come on.

      • bradenbost - Mar 15, 2011 at 11:13 PM

        stuckonwords–

        You’re making the error of thinking that your assessment of what took place and why on 4/20/99 trumps the research done by more than one person who has spent hours pouring over every last piece of information they could get in relation to those two boys–simply because the person who cited said research didn’t do the research themselves.

        Well what the people that did do the research found (there’s more than just the one book mentioned in that article) is that one of the boys was clearly psychopathic, and the other was depressed. Neither one of them EVER–E V E R reported being picked on or bullied. Not to peers, not to teachers, not to family, not even in their own journals. Their act was not intended to be an act against any specific group for retaliation from past wrongs, but to be an homage to the Oklahoma City bombing, and it failed, so they resorted to the massacre as it happened. Children don’t become murderers out of nowhere, but it’s a logical fallacy to say “Something caused this; some kids are bullied; therefore, these two had to have been bullied.” You’re leaving out the fact that some people are just born twisted (so, no, actually all evidence shows that we’re not born as clean slates–the only clean slate at birth is our list of choices made). You’re leaving out societal approaches to raising children. AND, in the case of the second boy, you’re leaving out depression–which doesn’t need bullying as a cause.

        Now, if you can confidently stick to your idea that Columbine was an extreme result of bullying in light of the fact that people who’ve looked into it more than you ever will say otherwise, then there’s no way we can have a conversation about it. You’re just stubborn.

        Regarding Richard, I can’t say what led him to what he did, but I CAN say a few other things:
        Seeing Richard pick on Casey, even punch him totally unprovoked (if the bodyslam isn’t justified, the punch to the face is certainly not justified), has sparked endless memories in myself of being picked on by the little guys like him. Granted, it’s my story and not Casey’s, but I at least recognize a type in Richard when I see it. The blurry features of Richard’s face are filled in in my mind with those of the boys who picked on me–small guys with nothing but simple rage in their hearts and something to prove. Make no mistake that the same thing has happened to thousands of people who were bullied in their youth when they saw this video. In MY situations, the little guys were never bullied into bullying. Ever. (In fact, that proposition is kind of ridiculous, especially when you take into consideration Richard’s confidence and body language.) Those boys were never really “good guys” at heart fallen in with the wrong crowds. They had the most to prove, so they were the worst to deal with.

        And in the end, what does it matter why Richard did it? He started a fight and got what he deserved. That’s the end of that story. People like you want to pour “love” (which is really anything but) and sympathy out like Niagara to every person who ever feels bad about anything. What people need sometimes–especially children–is some hard lessons. It’s unlikely that Richard will fully understand the impact of what happened to him that day right away, but he’s learned it, and by the time he’s an adult, there’s a much much bigger chance he’ll understand his errors.

        The quote, “It doesn’t matter where I came from; it matters where I’m going” comes to mind.

        So be my guest and spend your days crying over “misunderstood” children and defending the criminals. I will join those who understand that children are future adults and they need to learn, sometimes in difficult ways, not be padded and massaged and told sweet things about how special they are.

      • mitchelmarks - Mar 17, 2011 at 3:54 AM

        “It is a complete MYTH that Columbine happened as a result of bullying. I know that’s the common conception and that’s what everyone says, but it’s not true. Not remotely. Just like the stories of that girl who was asked if she believed in God, said yes, and was shot execution style. Didn’t happen. Do a little research on this and you’ll see I’m right. The Columbine kids WERE the bullies. They were not popular, as many bullies are, but they were the instigators in situations and they terrorized other kids. “

    • stylinred - Mar 15, 2011 at 11:51 AM

      this is in reply to your last comment to bhartman36

      1. i dont believe there is MORE bullying going on today than 20yrs ago; i just think the venues have changed, what with the internet/social networking; bullying has always existed it simply depends on the class and school some will have more some less.

      2. its not the schools place to raise your kids, or the daycare, or the television… its the god damned parents job; if they aren’t able to adequately raise their children than they shouldn’t have any… we (those without kids) shouldn’t have to be stuck with more taxes to fund schools so they can take up raising children as well

      • stuckonwords - Mar 15, 2011 at 10:13 PM

        If. If? And if the government loved us, they’d lower taxes.
        So I suppose you’re going to gamble your kids’ lives that other parents are going to do their jobs. I suppose you’re going to be the one to go neuter all the parents who don’t, and you’ll slaughter their kids. And when your kids sit in the school as hostages, you’ll blame it on bad parenting.
        Well I’ll tell you…you’re *right*!!! It *is* bad parenting! But screaming that at the top of your lungs doesn’t make your children more safe. The point of having a society is that we, in a progressive, evolving way, over generations of learning, make our best effort to set up a system that will ensure success even *when* individuals can’t do the job right. If what you say was how we let the world run, we wouldn’t bother with laws at all. We’d simply say that when someone murders someone, it was bad parenting; nothing any of us could’ve done. Huh? Of *course* there’s something we could’ve done. There are problems all over the place, and because we can’t just stand by and hope they’ll fix themselves (by wagging our finger and saying, “Shame on you! Raise your kids better!”) we instead invoke laws that offer deterrence. We have police roam the streets and make themselves be seen. Is it perfect? Hell no! But what else can we do? Oh…I know. How about we try to educate people…especially when they’re young and still impressionable…and try to teach them a better way to deal with things? Try to teach them a better course of action? Try to set a better example for them?
        What’s that you say? Their parents are setting bad examples and aren’t teaching them? Well no kidding. So what do we do? Nothing??? No. We try to build an educational system that grows with the growth of the population. The system doesn’t keep up. It loses ground, and we simply sacrifice the children in the process. What’s that, you say? It’s not fair? Well welcome to reality. The reality is that education is the first line of defense against the deterioration of society. If one generation, for whatever reason, screws up, let’s at least not let the next generation slip further. (Reminds me of our National Debt; but then, I guess we don’t really care about the generations to come, do we?)

      • stuckonwords - Mar 16, 2011 at 10:54 PM

        bradenbost-

        The number of assumptions you make and the stipulations that you make are almost comical, simply because you have decided, for everyone, that things you’ve said are unassailable facts. I beg to differ.

        First of all, while you say that “every last piece of information” has been collected (regarding the offenders at Columbine), how can you really prove that? If you’ve decided, for all of us, that there are no more bits of information or understanding about those kids to be had, I wonder how it is that you can make such a claim? I follow that up by addressing the next nonsensical statement you make:

        “some people are just born twisted (so, no, actually all evidence shows that we’re not born as clean slates–the only clean slate at birth is our list of choices made).”

        Oh really? You have some sort of proof of that? You’ve decided, for all humanity, that it is a fact that some people are just born twisted? You’ve decided, for all humanity (and in your mind, as a fact) that we’re not all born as clean slates? From where is your proof derived? I am firmly of the mind that a baby is not born evil, and until you can prove anything otherwise, I believe that I can provide a list billions long where not one baby has ever done one wrong thing, and not until those babies are influenced by the evils of society that they are “turned”. It seems to me that my multi-billion examples outweighs your zero examples by quite a large margin.

        You say: “The blurry features of Richard’s face are filled in in my mind with those of the boys who picked on me–small guys with nothing but simple rage in their hearts and something to prove. Make no mistake that the same thing has happened to thousands of people who were bullied in their youth when they saw this video. In MY situations, the little guys were never bullied into bullying. Ever.”

        You’re exactly right. It’s not your story. Your history is a bottled sample, and your point is diffused from the very start. “Ever”? Well maybe “ever” in your case. But if you seriously expect *the world* to operate the way your limited experience dictates, you’re in for a sad awakening that the world, and reality, is much bigger than you.

        You said, “What does it matter why Richard did it? He started a fight and got what he deserved. That’s the end of that story.”

        Oh really? By your decree? Nobody gets to have an opinion that differs from yours? I really *can* see that bullying has had a significant influence on your life, since you’re of the opinion that you, now, can bully the rest of the entire world into accepting your stance. Unfortunately, I have no intention of allowing you to bully me with your opinions. In *my* opinion, it *does* matter why Richard did it. Jesus Christ, I don’t *condone* his actions. But for you to decide, judge and jury, that he “got what he deserved”……..it’s a goddamn good thing you’re not actually a judge. I completely agree that Casey’s actions were justified. But to say that Richard got what he deserved…..I’m of the mind that maybe (maybe!) what he deserved was for someone to save him from whatever torment *he* might be going through. YOU don’t know.

        And lastly:
        “So be my guest and spend your days crying over “misunderstood” children and defending the criminals. I will join those who understand that children are future adults and they need to learn, sometimes in difficult ways, not be padded and massaged and told sweet things about how special they are.”

        It is, again, comical that you have decided that I “cry” from my misunderstanding, while you and yours “understand” things so much more clearly. That is obviously your opinion, but it is certainly not fact. Children are certainly future adults, but we completely disagree on whether the correct method of raising them is to beat them into submission or to guide them to wisdom. Feel free to beat your children; I suspect my methods will last a lot longer.

    • mizunate - Mar 15, 2011 at 12:52 PM

      Sad? Nope. Kinder-Gladiators is a new venture from Dana White. The business plan is to merge it into UFC in 7-9 years.

      Get a grip on this one. Some kid got tired of getting harrased, and faught back. We should be proud of the whole incident. He took a few hits, tried to turn the other cheek, then dumped that little punk on his cheek. I’d be strutting around that school like a show pony when my suspension ended if i was that kid. Think of all the girls who will want to hold his hand now!

    • nakolo61 - Mar 15, 2011 at 3:48 PM

      The little punk got what he deserved. No need to look into it further.

    • calbrandi - Mar 15, 2011 at 9:33 PM

      Casey is very lucky that little kid’s head didn’t slam on the concrete. It looked very close to me. That would have been tragic for many. ~ I like what you say, stuckonwords. I’m surprised by the amount of thumbs down. Thumbs up from me.

      My regards to Australia.

      • stuckonwords - Mar 15, 2011 at 10:17 PM

        Thank you, Cal. I knew when I decided to broach this that I would be presenting an unpopular view. The problem is, there are truths, and then there are deeper truths. There is a deeper truth at work here, and I really just couldn’t let it slide.

    • vetrodgers11 - Mar 15, 2011 at 11:16 PM

      I am amazed at the complete disregard for the potential problem that the child that was body slammed could have sustained from this type of “response” to bullying. This child could literally have been killed!! He was body slammed head first into the concrete by Casey. Yes, Casey has the right to DEFEND himself, but that does not mean taking on being the aggressor and inflicting potentially mortal harm on another child. As everyone seems to forget, he far outweighs the smaller child. Perhaps this did teach the bully and he will probably NEVER repeat this again…however, what are we teaching Casey? We are teaching him that with his excessive response that could have resulted in the DEATH of another child, that it is okay to respond in this fashion. He is not a hero. He is a child that should have responded, but with EQUAL response, not one that was lethal.
      I have a very large child. He is athletic, strong, and fast. He is 12 years old and wears a size 14 mens shoe. I would NEVER condone this type of use of his size, strength, or speed against a child half his size, regardless of the inciting reason. Equal use of force, not lethal force!! Really people, what is our value system that we think that a staggering, disoriented, half broken child is the appropriate response to a few quick face/body jabs to a much larger child??

      • reallyquestionmarc - Mar 17, 2011 at 9:54 PM

        type of response? really, did you see the video? That child clearly did not seem to mind the size differential, that being said, what do we do? appoint correct counter-response counselors to each child? and im fairly certain that they bully learned his lesson, if not im sure Casey can help out abit more. Perhaps these parents need to teach better values to their children, rather then trying to blame the child who is only protecting himself, and in one swift move he incapacitated his attacker and done, now had he proceed to attack the bully then you can cry all you want and i would probably agree with you to a certain extent, and good for you with your son.

    • reallyquestionmarc - Mar 17, 2011 at 9:36 PM

      How can any of us act like this was a good thing?

      well, simply because it IS, and THAT child, provoked the situation, after CLEARLY seeing that the much bigger child was passive that is until he was pushed, pushed some more, pushed a little to far.. And comparing this to columbine is abit much if you ask me, here a child learned a VALUABLE lesson in life, as opposed to sadly students losing their lives, perhaps we should stop blaming the schools and students and start looking at the parents of these children that feel they need to lash out at others, or we could appoint counselors to each child, oh and prescribe them meds, there’s a thought. oh wait

  4. fossil555 - Mar 15, 2011 at 8:13 AM

    I’m not too sure what kind of geographic audience is here reading but I for one live in Sydney’s Western Suburbs (the region where this incident took place). I am also around Corey’s age.

    The younger ‘bully’ here meets the stereotype of what in Western Sydney is called a ‘lad’. The definition of a lad is accessed on Urban Dictionary (will also be listed under adlay – this group of ‘lads’ speak in pig Latin quite frequently). These kids instil fear into anyone; young or old walking the streets. Western Sydney has become a much more fearful place; no longer can we walk down the streets, go to the shops or even travel in our trains without having some form of suspicion about these kids. They wear those Nike dri-fit hats and TN’s (like the bully appears to be wearing). These kids threaten anyone with violence (more often than not with weapons), will often abuse others in groups, travel in packs and gangs, and will steal from anyone anything they can get. In schools, these aren’t your normal bully. They intimidate and stand over everyone and anyone.

    The police are fearful of these gangs…school principals and teachers wouldn’t dare challenge these kids. The everyday public steer clear at all costs. This is a problem which spans the entire Western Sydney region, an area almost 3000 square kilometres. What Corey did is far more significant than standing up for himself against some little playground bully….he stood up for the entire population who lives in fear and feels restricted in their everyday movements because of the group of people the little bully represent. This is a criticism of the structure of society and the ineffectual methods of punishment for young children who have strayed off the rails. I’m glad Corey made it as powerful as possible.

    So to Corey, thanks for standing up on behalf of everyone in Western Sydney and in communities around the world who are fearful of these groups of delinquents. The whole world is behind you.

    • fossil555 - Mar 15, 2011 at 8:18 AM

      I’m not too sure what kind of geographic audience is here reading but I for one live in Sydney’s Western Suburbs (the region where this incident took place). I am also around Casey’s age.

      The younger ‘bully’ here meets the stereotype of what in Western Sydney is called a ‘lad’. The definition of a lad is accessed on Urban Dictionary (will also be listed under adlay – this group of ‘lads’ speak in pig Latin quite frequently). These kids instil fear into anyone; young or old walking the streets. Western Sydney has become a much more fearful place; no longer can we walk down the streets, go to the shops or even travel in our trains without having some form of suspicion about these kids. They wear those Nike dri-fit hats and TN’s (like the bully appears to be wearing). These kids threaten anyone with violence (more often than not with weapons), will often abuse others in groups, travel in packs and gangs, and will steal from anyone anything they can get. In schools, these aren’t your normal bully. They intimidate and stand over everyone and anyone.

      The police are fearful of these gangs…school principals and teachers wouldn’t dare challenge these kids. The everyday public steer clear at all costs. This is a problem which spans the entire Western Sydney region, an area almost 3000 square kilometres. What Casey did is far more significant than standing up for himself against some little playground bully….he stood up for the entire population who lives in fear and feels restricted in their everyday movements because of the group of people the little bully represent. This is a criticism of the structure of society and the ineffectual methods of punishment for young children who have strayed off the rails. I’m glad Casey made it as powerful as possible.

      So to Casey, thanks for standing up on behalf of everyone in Western Sydney and in communities around the world who are fearful of these groups of delinquents. The whole world is behind you.

  5. lyrasilvertounge - Mar 15, 2011 at 8:36 AM

    What the hell to you mean “Australia, is there any way we can push you further out to sea?”?
    If a child in a US school acted with this amount of force while defending him/her self, he/she would also be suspended from school or ‘punished’ in a similar way. The school would not care who was right or wrong in the situation, they would act towards anyone involved in a fight in their grounds.
    FFS.

    • Rick Chandler - Mar 15, 2011 at 11:03 AM

      Sure, shoot the messenger.

      • lyrasilvertounge - Mar 15, 2011 at 11:38 AM

        I will shoot the messenger who sends the message that all of Australia should be shunned because one small school decided to suspend the victim – as well as the bully – in a violent bullying incident.

    • Rick Chandler - Mar 15, 2011 at 12:18 PM

      Mr. G, is that you?

      • lyrasilvertounge - Mar 20, 2011 at 2:03 AM

  6. BC - Mar 15, 2011 at 9:49 AM

    I was bullied constantly in seventh grade by this one kid that was a little bigger than me. I was the new kid, just having moved there. Finally one day he grabbed me by my shirt, so I wound up and hit with all I had. Busted his nose. I ended up getting booted from school for a week. But the kid (no anyone else) bothered me again. And my dad was glad I stood up for myself.
    I’m in favor of what Casey did. Good for him. Only way to fix a bully is to fight back as hard as you can. Bet that kid or any other kid in the school doesn’t bother him again.

  7. Merked - Mar 15, 2011 at 7:07 PM

    Australia, is there any way we can push you further out to sea?

    Oh, hilarious stuff. Will we see the same sort of comedy next time there is yet another US high school shooting massacre because I know in Australia we all love making fun of those!!

  8. renlim32 - Mar 16, 2011 at 12:35 AM

    Your suggestion that people ‘enjoy’ this, says about as much about you as your ridiculous generalisation regarding Australians. The vast majority of Australians who saw this would be sickened. The child could have been killed and you make jokes about it? Get a life or better yet why don’t you go down to the beach and keep swimming out?

    • Rick Chandler - Mar 18, 2011 at 4:49 PM

      ** Get a life or better yet why don’t you go down to the beach and keep swimming out? **

      A very insensitive reponse, considering that you appear to be Australian.

      http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/Coroner_finds_that_Australian_Prime_Minister_Holt_drowned_in_1967

  9. betarec2001 - Mar 16, 2011 at 4:42 AM

    All these comments about US school shootings, etc. Keep this in mind. The ones that shoot up schools are the kids that get bullied and DO NOT retaliate. That is until they are pushed so far that they end up obliterating a large portion of their classmates. If a kid is being picked on for a long time, I feel they have every right to smash their tormentor into concrete. After all, It might just save the lives of your innocent children.

    • renlim32 - Mar 17, 2011 at 4:12 AM

      Problem should be sorted well before it comes to this, most of the students in the school were aware of the problem and therefore so would the teachers who at this stage may well be facing criminal charges regarding duty of care and negligence. To draw comparisons with school shootings is dramatising the situation, to say any child and they are children remember, deserves to be smashed into concrete is ridiculous. You should grow up.

  10. theaussieword - Mar 16, 2011 at 5:25 AM

    Honestly cheers go out too casey your a champ! You can only turn the cheek so much and everyone has their limits casey met his and had enough that little shit deserved it. I admit i got into fights at school i wasnt the one who started it but i could finish it! school fights always happen its just that were now the information generation that it gets around so fast. Sure you’ll have the soft whining types that’ll say that it shouldnt of happened in the first place people just need too know how too HTFU (harden the F**K up!) Honestly the image of the lil aussie battler is disappearing these days! If my kid ever came home from school with a black id be proud if he gave the other one a black eye too sure violence isnt always the answer but there are people who you just cant reason with verbally!!!

  11. dmaxfixer - Mar 17, 2011 at 5:33 PM

    My son was one of the bullied kids. He was bullied for 6 years and we were told at every meeting we ever had with the school that my son was the problem and we all needed to work together to fix him! As a result of all this my son started acting out, etc. One day afterhe recieved a particularly bad beating from one of the same kids, i told the principal that i was sick of telling my son to turn the other cheek and if the kids did it again I was telling my son to “beat the kids ass like a drum”. I would then take him out for ice cream and we would play video games during his suspension. Next day guess what… he beat that kids ass and now, no problems with bullies. His attitude is awesome and he is doing wonderful in school. Lesson: sticking up for your self is always the right thing no matter what.

  12. reallyquestionmarc - Mar 17, 2011 at 10:08 PM

    It’s always nice to see one stand up for himself, and no i don’t care that the child was half his size, he didn’t seem to care that he was attacking someone twice his size so why should i? Casey whether you know it or not I’m sure you have inspired many children also getting bullied to stand up for themselves. In my opinion, maybe these parents should stop blaming others for the actions of their children, and start to instill better values in THEIR own children. awesome job Casey..

  13. brobrorockshard - Mar 30, 2011 at 11:18 AM

    http://m.youtube.com/index?desktop_uri=%2F&gl=US#/watch?xl=xl_blazer&v=QSmRSdFvr9o