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Did surfer Andy Irons die of a methadone overdose?

Dec 29, 2010, 12:09 PM EDT

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New controversy over the death in November of surfing legend Andy Irons, whose widow has filed an injunction to stop the release of his autopsy report. Lyndie Irons, who gave birth to their child in December, told a Texas court that the release of the report would do “immediate and irrevocable harm” to herself and her newborn child. The three-time world champion was found dead in a Dallas hotel room, where he was on a layover en route to his home in Hawaii. He had earlier pulled out of the 2010 Rip Curl Pro Search in Puerto Rico due to illness.

A Tarrant County, Texas, judge approved the injunction, stopping the release of the results until May 20.

He had reportedly been battling with dengue fever, a viral disease. From ESPN:

“Should the autopsy report be released now,” reads the injunction request, “Lyndie Irons and her newborn child would suffer immediate and irrevocable harm in that the branding value would be greatly diminished as a result of the intense news frenzy.”

“Based upon ‘leaks’ that have already occurred within the Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office and the press reaction to those leaks, the branding of Andy Irons’ company will be immediately, irreparably and severely tarnished if the official autopsy report is released at this time,” Lyndie Irons said in a Dec. 23 story posted on Courthousenews.com.

It was initially reported by several news outlets that Irons may have died due to a bout with dengue fever, a virus-based disease spread by mosquitoes. But the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported the death was being investigated as a possible drug overdose after methadone was discovered in a zolpidem bottle at Irons’ bedside.

On Nov. 3, TMZ released a copy of the police report from the Dallas hotel room where Irons was found. According to the report, police found bottles of alprazolam (the generic version of Xanax) and zolpidem (the generic version of Ambien) on the tables near the bed. Both are prescription drugs.

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Andy Irons autopsy results withheld [ESPN]