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During The Olympics, Crazy Canadians To Collect Cloven-Hoofed Critters For Charity

Jan 17, 2010, 3:00 PM EDT

Joel Nagtegaal, a kooky Canadian student living in British Columbia, has a wacky idea for how to best take advantage of Canada’s assumed dominance in several events during the Winter Olympics in Vancouver next month and put it to a good cause.
Nagtegaal, clearly a visionary, came up with a wonderful idea: how about he arranges a system where goats can be donated to poor nations for every gold medal the Canadians win? You know, for charity. Wait, what?

Nagtegaal has launched goatforgold.com, a campaign that asks Canadians to donate a goat to nations such as Bangladesh and Zambia every time an athlete from the Great White North strikes gold during the 2010 Games.

Brilliant! But don’t think for a second that an idea as ingenious as this just springs forth over a matter of moments out of the blue. Of course, the movement originally arose courtesy of how every great thing the Canadians accomplish comes to fruition: hockey.
Nagtegaal, 24, originally came up with idea during last season’s NHL playoffs, was originally a means to do something good in honor of the playoff run by his beloved Vancouver Canucks.

They had already started working on playoff goatees when they – perhaps fuelled by the post-game brewskis – stumbled upon the goat idea.

They wanted to donate 16 goats in all, since 16 playoff wins would make the Canucks Stanley Cup champions.

But the idea quickly caught fire, as one person set up a Facebook group and another created a website dubbed goatcanucksgoat.com.

By the time the drive was complete, 1,073 goats had been pledged and distributed to Kenyan families in need.

Well done, eh.
The benefit of donating goats is that they are relatively cheap to care for and raise, have many uses and reproduce quickly. The cost of donating a goat is a paltry $34.50 and when one of the goats donated gives birth, the offspring is donated to another needy family in the area.
Genius.
Best of luck to Mr. Nagtegaal in his charitable endeavor. Hopefully, none of the goats donated have the capacity of speech. If that is the case, any talking goat donated should come with a three-foot rope and a hickory stick. Maybe an AM radio would be nice, too. I know it’s not as nice as MTZ or a trip to a Ragu festival, but at least the radio could keep the goat company, right?
And yes, as you can see, I have no shame and will happily make Adam Sandler references from 15+ years ago. My thoughts are if you make said references at a medium pace, no one makes a big deal about it.
Goat for gold: Canadians donate goats [CTV Olympics]

  1. Ryan - Jan 18, 2010 at 3:43 AM

    LOL. Funny stuff. I wish some American would of thunk of it.

  2. Lifeforce - Jan 19, 2010 at 2:30 PM

    This is a horrible way to celebrate the Vancouver 2010 Olympics. Breeding more goats that will be subject to a miserable life must be stopped.
    We must send poor Africans healthy food, water filtration systems, medicines, seeds, tools, books/education supplies, friut and shelter trees and other donations that help them without causing animal abuse. The donation seekers show photos of cute goats but not the stressful transport, abusive living conditions and their throats being cut.
    If you care about animals: Farm animals are smart. All can suffer, experience pain and know joy. Why supply them to places where they may not be fed properly and will definitely have her throat slit? These animals are mistreated as commodities and portrayed as cheerful participants in their own miserable lives and death.
    If you care about people: Asia and Africa have the highest levels of lactose intolerance, with upwards of 90% being unable to properly digest milk. In Zambia, nearly 100% of the population is lactose intolerant. We must provide heathy vegetarian food.
    If you care about the environment: Farm animals drink a lot and they eat a lot. Goats especially are known destroyers of land and creators of deserts. These people have enough problems they don’t need more. Since these recipients are already living on such limited resources, why add another resource-guzzling burden in the form of livestock?
    So Goat For Gold No! See:
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Goat-For-Gold-No/257816742820?ref=ts

  3. Buster - Jan 23, 2010 at 7:49 PM

    It is obvioua that lifeforce has not been to the countries she is describing. The organization, Christian Reformed World Relief Committee(CRWRC) does supply water filtration systems, water pumps and medical help. Interestingly, in most areas seeds are available for purchase at the local feed and seed store.
    My wife and I have been on several extended trips to Uganda, Kenya, and Zambia to volunteer our time working with CRWRC employees who live in these countries and assist and teach good animal husbandry to the people who receive the goats.
    I can assure you that your ststement that nearly “100% of the Zambian population is lactose intolerant” is not true. Milk is sold in the local stores and in the market in Zambia on a daily basis.
    The villagers that raise the goats are very careful that the goats don’t devistate the land because food for the goats is their extra income.
    When a family has 3 or 4 goats they are able to sell the extra milk at the market or to restaurants. They also make cheese that is sold at the market. This extra income pays for school fees, clothes and other family needs.
    The CRWRC employees assist the people who own the goats so that they are not “a money-guzzling burden” but a way to help these families out of poverty.
    I suggest that you view the reports about a successful goat farm in Uganda at mbaledairy.com You might be surprised to see the value of goats in Africa. Additional information about the worlwide work of CRWRC is available at crwrc.org.

  4. Jimbo - Jan 29, 2010 at 9:57 AM

    Well said, Buster. Also, in response to Lifeforce, it should be clarified that the goats are not transported from North America, but actually born and raised on African soil. Much of the money required to fund each goat is used for goat vaccination and training sessions on animal husbandry and animal care. This is a great idea with winners all around–even the goats who likely get better treatment than they would otherwise!!

  5. camslab - Feb 13, 2010 at 8:38 PM

    animals have been picking up humans long enough. pick your own dam selves up. and whats with the selected pic w/ this story? baaaaaa-d.
    the olympics suck…dream team pros that already make too much money for entertainment. F canada and those stupid mittens dyed red with seal blood…skanky frog country.

  6. watch green zone online - Feb 19, 2010 at 10:01 AM

    Thanks!